Posts tagged photoshop

wb7qel:

Tall Ships Early in the Morning (HDR) by Genji A on Flickr.

wb7qel:

Tall Ships Early in the Morning (HDR) by Genji A on Flickr.

jusdou:

Gemma by Lies Thru a Lens  on Flickr.

jusdou:

Gemma by Lies Thru a Lens  on Flickr.

jusdou:

Gemma by Lies Thru a Lens  on Flickr.

jusdou:

Gemma by Lies Thru a Lens  on Flickr.

wb7qel:

A Menace by Olli Kekäläinen on Flickr.

wb7qel:

A Menace by Olli Kekäläinen on Flickr.

froggieslightroom:

Sometimes things are just too darn bright. I wanted to shoot this light with the bulb on, but I also wanted to keep the detail of the curly bits. If I expose the photo properly, the light will blow out and have no detail. If I expose for the light, nothing else will be visible. 
My solution to this was to take two shots. One exposing for the light, and one normal with the light turned off. I edited the photo in Lightroom and got it how I wanted and then I exported my two exposures to Photoshop. I put the image with the bulb turned on as the top layer and added a layer mask. I fill the mask completely with black making it disappear. Black stuff in a mask goes away, white stuff becomes visible. So I take a soft paint brush with white selected and start painting on my layer mask. I just hit the area where the bulb is. This reveals the lit bulb and keeps everything else the same.  froggieslightroom:

Sometimes things are just too darn bright. I wanted to shoot this light with the bulb on, but I also wanted to keep the detail of the curly bits. If I expose the photo properly, the light will blow out and have no detail. If I expose for the light, nothing else will be visible. 
My solution to this was to take two shots. One exposing for the light, and one normal with the light turned off. I edited the photo in Lightroom and got it how I wanted and then I exported my two exposures to Photoshop. I put the image with the bulb turned on as the top layer and added a layer mask. I fill the mask completely with black making it disappear. Black stuff in a mask goes away, white stuff becomes visible. So I take a soft paint brush with white selected and start painting on my layer mask. I just hit the area where the bulb is. This reveals the lit bulb and keeps everything else the same.  froggieslightroom:

Sometimes things are just too darn bright. I wanted to shoot this light with the bulb on, but I also wanted to keep the detail of the curly bits. If I expose the photo properly, the light will blow out and have no detail. If I expose for the light, nothing else will be visible. 
My solution to this was to take two shots. One exposing for the light, and one normal with the light turned off. I edited the photo in Lightroom and got it how I wanted and then I exported my two exposures to Photoshop. I put the image with the bulb turned on as the top layer and added a layer mask. I fill the mask completely with black making it disappear. Black stuff in a mask goes away, white stuff becomes visible. So I take a soft paint brush with white selected and start painting on my layer mask. I just hit the area where the bulb is. This reveals the lit bulb and keeps everything else the same.  froggieslightroom:

Sometimes things are just too darn bright. I wanted to shoot this light with the bulb on, but I also wanted to keep the detail of the curly bits. If I expose the photo properly, the light will blow out and have no detail. If I expose for the light, nothing else will be visible. 
My solution to this was to take two shots. One exposing for the light, and one normal with the light turned off. I edited the photo in Lightroom and got it how I wanted and then I exported my two exposures to Photoshop. I put the image with the bulb turned on as the top layer and added a layer mask. I fill the mask completely with black making it disappear. Black stuff in a mask goes away, white stuff becomes visible. So I take a soft paint brush with white selected and start painting on my layer mask. I just hit the area where the bulb is. This reveals the lit bulb and keeps everything else the same. 

froggieslightroom:

Sometimes things are just too darn bright. I wanted to shoot this light with the bulb on, but I also wanted to keep the detail of the curly bits. If I expose the photo properly, the light will blow out and have no detail. If I expose for the light, nothing else will be visible. 

My solution to this was to take two shots. One exposing for the light, and one normal with the light turned off. I edited the photo in Lightroom and got it how I wanted and then I exported my two exposures to Photoshop. I put the image with the bulb turned on as the top layer and added a layer mask. I fill the mask completely with black making it disappear. Black stuff in a mask goes away, white stuff becomes visible. So I take a soft paint brush with white selected and start painting on my layer mask. I just hit the area where the bulb is. This reveals the lit bulb and keeps everything else the same.